Complementary Databases: country-level data

As a courtesy, LIS makes available some datasets and databases that provide country-level indicators that might be useful to our microdata users and other comparative researchers. These have been compiled by various LIS staff and other scholars, including past LIS Visiting Scholars.

Codebooks and other details about these compilations – including required citation guidelines – are included for each, and we urge you to review these if you make use of these resources. We also urge you to contact the producers of these data directly if you have questions.

Note: If you have a dataset or database containing country-level variables that might be of use to LIS researchers, please contact us. We would be happy to lodge your data on our website!

LIS / New York Times Income Distribution Database (2014), assembled by Janet Gornick (LIS), Thierry Kruten (LIS), Branko Milanovic (LIS), David Leonhardt (NYT), and Kevin Quealy (NYT), includes detailed information on the distribution and growth of household income across countries. The database contains results from 164 LIS datasets from 23 countries, covering the period 1979 to 2010.

All results are based on the standard LIS variable, disposable household income; the results are presented in three formats (per capita, per equivalent unit, per household) and in two different currency measures (national currencies and 2005 international dollars). An initial report was published in the New York Times on 22 April 2014.

Database
Report

Social Assistance and Minimum Income Protection Interim Data Set (SaMip) (2009), assembled by Kenneth Nelson, includes detailed information on the benefit position of low-income households in industrialized democracies. SaMip is an ongoing research project based at the Swedish Institute for Social Research at Stockholm University.

Details
Data
Variables and Codes
Documentation

Comparative Welfare States Data Set (2014), compiled by David Brady, Evelyne Huber, and John D. Stephens, provides an array of country-level welfare state, economic, institutional, political, policy, and demographic indicators. The CWS includes information on 22 rich democracies from 1960-2011.

Codebook
Database
Stata

Social Policy in Latin America and the Caribbean Dataset (1960-2006), compiled by Evelyne Huber, John D. Stephens, Thomas Mustillo, and Jennifer Pribble at the University of North Carolina (2008), provides country-level social policy indicators over time, including social welfare, economic, and demographic indicators.

Codebook
Database

Institutions that Build Economic Security and Asset Holdings Database (2008), compiled by Janet Gornick, Timothy Smeeding, Eva Sierminska, and Maurice Leach, includes variables on countries’ institutions related to income security and wealth. This database is designed to be useful to researchers using the LWS microdata.

Details
Database
References

Budget Incidence Fiscal Redistribution Database (2011), prepared by Koen Caminada and Chen Wang, presents the disentanglement of income inequality and the redistributive effect of social transfers and taxes in 36 LIS countries for the period 1970-2006 (Waves I – Wave VI of LIS). This database refines, updates, and extends the Fiscal Redistribution Data Set (see below) prepared by David Jesuit and Vincent Mahler.

Details
Database
Working Paper 567
Working Paper 581

Fiscal Redistribution Data Set (2005, 2008), prepared by David Jesuit and Vincent Mahler, provides country-level measures of fiscal retribution in several countries included in the LIS Database.

Details
Database

A Detailed Look at Parental Leave Policies in 21 OECD Countries (2008), compiled by Rebecca Ray of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in the United States, provides country-level data on the leave eligibility, duration, benefit levels, part-time options, and job protections. An associated report by Rebecca Ray, Janet Gornick and John Schmitt synthesizes findings based on the policy data.

Details
Report

Measures that Govern Rights to Alternate Work Arrangements in 21 OECD Countries (2007), assembled by Ariane Hegewisch and Janet Gornick, provides country-level information on working time regulations pertaining to alternative work arrangements. An associated report by Ariane Hegewisch and Janet Gornick synthesizes findings based on the policy data.

Details
Report

Family Policy Database (1997, 2003), compiled by Janet Gornick, Marcia Meyers and (for the 1997 version) Katherin Ross, includes country-level data on public policies that enable parental employment, including child care, family leave, and working time regulations.

1997 Version

Details
Family Policy 1997 Data

2003 Version

Details
Family Leave Policies Data
Working Time Regulations Data
Data Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) Data
Policy Indexes Data
References

The Work-Family Policy Indicators (2012), assembled by Irene Boeckmann, Michelle Budig, and Joya Misra, include country-level data on birth-related and extended leave policies,  early childhood education and care, and the regulation of working time. The dataset includes 12 country-level indicators, covering 22 countries, including countries in Europe and North America, as well as Australia. The indicators are intended to be used together with microdata from the Luxembourg Income Study Database (LIS). With a few exceptions, the policy measures are matched to the years corresponding to LIS’ Wave 5 microdata. The construction of this database was funded by the United States’ National Science Foundation.

Documentation and Institutional Details
Indicators

OECD Income Distribution Database (2013) includes a set of poverty and inequality measures, as well as average and median disposable income and other related indicators.

Database

Comparative Welfare Entitlements Dataset (2013), assembled by Lyle Scruggs, Detlef Jahn, and Kati Kuitto, provides systematic data on institutional features of social insurance programs in 33 countries spanning much of the post-war period. Data are provided for unemployment insurance, sickness insurance, and standard and minimum pensions; indicators include replacement rates, eligibility criteria, and coverage.

Database