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by Gintare Mazeikaite (LIS)

Peru is one of the Latin American countries that experienced substantial income growth and strongly decreasing intergenerational inequalities since the early 2000s. Analysing the Peruvian data from 2004 to 2019, Gintare Mazeikaite shows how income growth has been especially beneficial for some groups of the society, but how it left other groups behind, the elderly in particular.

Full article is available here.

by Bruce Bradbury (UNSW Sydney), Aya Abe (Tokyo Metropolitan University), Markus Jäntti (Stockholm University), Inhoe Ku (Seoul National University), and Julia Shu-Huah Wang (University of Hong Kong)

In Japan, South Korea and Taiwan, child poverty rates are relatively low, despite weak social protection for families with children. Why is this so? This joint work by several authors first focuses on the welfare regime approach in East Asia. However, then the authors present that there are other common characteristics contributing to their relative poverty success: families with children have benefited from recent economic growth more than the older population, parents have high employment levels, lone parent families are uncommon, and private between-household income transfers are more common.

Full article is available here.

by Xabier García Fuente (Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona)

Welfare states reduce inequality through taxes and transfers, but countries differ greatly in how they carry out this function, both in their policies and outcomes. How can we explain this variance? Using all LIS datasets, García Fuente provides several insights into cross-national differences in the world regions, while also supplying various indicators to measure how pro-poor or pro-rich social benefits are. The article elaborates further on the “paradox of redistribution” first identified by Korpi and Palme (1998).

Full article is available here.

LIS is happy to announce the following data updates:

  • Austria – Further annualisation of the country series back to 1994 for the LIS Database (3 new and 4 revised).
  • China – Addition of one data point CN18 to the LIS Database (1 new and 1 revised).
  • Norway – One new data point for Norway (NO20) added to both the LIS and LWS Databases (1 new).
  • Peru – Further annualisation of the country series back to 2004 for the LIS Database (4 new and 12 revised).
  • United Kingdom – Addition of two new data points (UK19/20) to the LIS Database (2 new and 19 revised).
  • Canada – Addition of CA19 to the LWS Database (1 new and 1 revised).
  • Chile – Addition of 2 new data points for the Chilean series on the LWS Database (2 new and 1 revised).
  • General Revisions to LIS/LWS Databases




  Click on each hyperlinked item to access more details on the newly added and revised datasets

Cecilia García-Peñalosa is a Professor of Economics at Aix Marseille School of Economics, presented the 2022 LIS Summer lecture: The geography of income mobility.

Cecilia is also a senior research fellow at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS). Her fields of interest are Economic growth and development, income inequality, and gender in labour markets.

The LIS: Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg is a non-profit organisation located in Luxembourg which serves a global community of researchers, educators, and policy makers. LIS acquires datasets with income, wealth, employment, and demographic data from many high- and middle-income countries, harmonises them to enable cross-national comparisons, and makes them publicly available in two databases, the Luxembourg Income Study Database (LIS) and the Luxembourg Wealth Study Database (LWS).

LIS is currently seeking applications for a Microdata Expert (2-year contract) – REF: LIS-2022-1

Main Responsibilities

The position involves joining a dynamic team of 10 people based in Luxembourg to produce harmonised datasets. This includes evaluating the original datasets structure and quality (possibly working with data providers), harmonising original variables, documenting harmonisation methods and dataset specificities, assisting and instructing users.

Candidate’s profile

  • Advanced degree in in statistics, sociology, economics, demography, or another social science.
  • Extensive experience in data management, preferably large micro datasets with a focus on income, consumption or wealth.
  • Advanced knowledge of Stata is required; knowledge of R is an asset, as is experience working with the LIS data.
  • Excellent command of English is required (office language), other languages are an asset.
  • Strong quantitative skills, ability to pay attention to detail and to work closely within a team in a cooperative way.

Preferred starting date

The position needs to be filled as soon as possible. The exact start date will be agreed upon with the selected applicant.

Contract

  • 2-year fixed-term contract (may lead to a permanent contract)
  • Full time (40h a week)

Interested?

Applicants should submit a cover letter and a Curriculum Vitae to Ms. Lucie Scapoli, search@lisdatacenter.org.

Please make sure to specify the REF of the job position in the subject of your email.

Applications will be considered until the position is filled.

The LIS: Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg is a non-profit organisation located in Luxembourg. LIS acquires datasets with income, wealth, employment and demographic data from a large number of countries and harmonises them to allow the international research community to run cross-national comparisons.

LIS seeks applications for 2 positions to support the National Statistical Office of Luxembourg (STATEC):

#1. Microdata Expert (2-year contract) REF:LIS-STATEC-50%

Preferred starting date : 01 November 2022

Contract

  • 2-year fixed-term contract (may lead to a permanent contract)
  • Half time (20h a week)

#2. Microdata Expert (2-year contract) REF:LIS-STATEC-100%

Preferred starting date : 15 October 2022

Contract

  • 2-year fixed-term contract (may lead to a permanent contract)
  • Full time (40h a week)

Your mission

Your position involves supporting the National Statistical Office of Luxembourg (STATEC) in the production of the national EU-SILC data:

  • Preparation of the survey questionnaire
  • Data checking and validation
  • Imputation of missing income components
  • Gross-net tax calculations
  • Computation of sampling weights
  • Construction of the final datasets to be transmitted to Eurostat
  • Writing of a quality report and documentation of the whole process

This position also involves contributing to methodological work using microdata from other STATEC surveys:

  • Estimation of mode effect
  • Matching income, consumption and wealth

Your profile

  • The successful candidate will have an MA in statistics, sociology, economics, econometrics, demography, or another social science.
  • Familiarity with the EU-SILC data and the commonly agreed EU indicators is a strong asset.
  • Extensive experience working with microdata using SAS, STATA or R statistical software, so as attention to detail.
  • Command of spoken English is required. Luxembourgish and French are an asset.

Location:The work is to be performed at the STATEC premises in Luxembourg.

Interested?

Applicants should submit a cover letter and a Curriculum Vitae to Ms. Lucie Scapoli, search@lisdatacenter.org.

Please make sure to specify the REF of the job position in the subject of your email.

Applications will be considered until the position is filled.

by Carmen Petrovici, Jörg Neugschwender, and Heba Omar (LIS)

Luxembourg – the small country located in the heart of Europe, is characterized by its diversified population. In this brief article, Carmen Petrovici, Jörg Neugschwender, and Heba Omar are looking in the new Luxembourgish data from 2015 to 2019, focusing on immigration background and different household types in order to identify population sub-groups with high poverty rates.

Full article is available here.

by Louis Chauvel (University of Luxembourg)

The French data series has been updated in March 2022.“The best way to evaluate the added value of the new series is to compare it with the old one.” By comparing various indicators, Louis Chauvel is comparing results based on the newly available data series from the Tax Income Survey against the previously available data from the household budget survey.

Full article is available here.

LIS is happy to invite you to its 2022 Summer Lecture on “The geography of income mobility” By Cecilia García-Peñalosa, Aix Marseille School of Economics. The lecture will take place on Monday, July 4th, 2022 11:30-12:30 [Luxembourg Local Time] Esch-Belval Luxembourg.

Economists have long been interested in inter-generational mobility. Initial explanations based on easily-identifiable factors such as educational attainment have overtime been expanded to include aspects such as non-cognitive skills and, more recently, geography. Where you are born matters for mobility. This talk will explore recent evidence showing that there are significant differences in the degree of upwards mobility across location, and try to identify to what extent broad developments in the labour market, such as employment polarization, are behind these differences.

Registration

Those interested in attending the lecture should register via this link before the 25th of June 2022 as seats are limited.
The lecture will be followed by a Buffet lunch.

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